Recommended Read
Moyshelé Rosencrantz,
Maker of Riddles

a collection of skillfully crafted riddles in the Old English style

The Moyshele Rosencrantz blog

Your email:
Monday Feb 17, 2014

Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis

So what is Persepolis? In stark black-and-white images, it is the autobiographical account of Marjane growing up in troubled times in Iran. She experienced the overthrow of the Shah and the Iranian Revolution at the age of 10, and then lived under the Ayatollah's repressive regime, except for an interlude during high-school in Austria, until she finally left Iran for good at the age of 24. The beauty of the comic is that it manages to capture Marjane's slowly maturing state-of-mind at all these different periods of her life. When she is a child, the story is told from the mind of a child, including her atypical answer to "what do you want to be when you grow up?" "A prophet".

[Read More]

Monday Jan 20, 2014

Jane Austen and the Jews

A study of blood heritage in Jane Austen’s novels after going through a Jane Austen reading binge (all six novels in one month), and of a related question in Jewish thought today. Two questions are examined: “Who is a gentleman?” and “Who is a Jew?”

[Read More]

Monday Nov 25, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 11

The last in a series of eleven blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. This is the final part, where Lova tells about his first few years after arriving in Israel

[Read More]

Sunday Nov 17, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 10

The tenth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova wanders about on his own in the dark, trying to find his way across the border to Metulla.

[Read More]

Thursday Nov 14, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 9

The ninth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova finds a man who claims he can help him steal the border... and gives it a try, together with an unknown teenage boy met in the streets of Beirut.

[Read More]

Monday Nov 11, 2013

The Great War of 1914

In honour of World War I armistice day, here's another one of my singable translations of the great french singer-songwriter Georges Brassens: his song for the glory of the Great War of 1914. I'm convinced World War I was one of the greatest stupidities in the history of Europe and mankind, and if it had been prevented, there wouldn't have been either a Nazi Germany or a Soviet Union under the command of little father of the people, Stalin...

[Read More]

Tuesday Sep 17, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 8

The eighth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova tells about his arrival in Beirut, and how he scares the daylight out of the contact he was given there...

[Read More]

Wednesday Sep 11, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 7

The seventh in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova tells about an unpleasant experience he had in the jail of Aleppo...

[Read More]

Monday Sep 09, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 6

The sixth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova crosses the border into Syria, then under French control, and is thrown straight away back into jail.

[Read More]

Thursday Sep 05, 2013

Marquise

I previously posted up several of my translations of the great French singer-songwriter, Georges Brassens into English, “The Gorilla”, “The Friend Ship”, “The Lousy Reputation”, and “My loves of yore”. I now turn to an example of Brassens putting other people's poetry to music, as he quite often did. The poem in question is the famous Stances à Marquise by Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), written in 1658 when Corneille was in his fifties, to the beautiful, charming actress Marquise-Thérèse de Gorla (1633-1668), also known as Mademoiselle du Parc, a member of Molière's theatre troup. Marquise had refused all of Corneille's advances. In retaliation, he wrote one of his most famous poems. I've included Corneille's original, for those of you who can read French, along with a fairly literal translation, and my singable rendition. It includes several unforgettable lines, which I was unable to translate nearly as well, such as: “On m'a vu ce que vous êtes, vous serez ce que je suis.” In the stanzas which Brassens left out, the poem highlights the importance of the mind over the body, claiming that in 1000 years, people will only remember Marquise to be as beautiful as Corneille chose to describe her.

[Read More]

Wednesday Sep 04, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 5

The fifth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova escapes from exile, where he was sent by the Turkish government, and tries to continue by foot all the way to Syria.

[Read More]

Sunday Sep 01, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 4

The fourth in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova is in jail, without any money or any food. He thinks up a nice trick for getting some food to eat. Little by little, he gets to know his jailors and fellow prisoners. But when the order comes to send him back to Russia, he loses his temper...

[Read More]

Monday Jul 08, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 3

The third in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova crosses the border into Turkey, and immediately goes to the local police to declare himself, so as to avoid being accused of spying.

[Read More]

Friday Jul 05, 2013

My Grandfather's Exodus - Part 2

The second in a series of blog entries in which my grandfather, Arieh Rabani (Lova Rabinovitch), tells his adventures walking from the Soviet Union to Israel (1927-1929). You'll find the first part here. In this part, Lova makes it to a sanatorium in Georgia, earns some money, and prepares to steal across the border to Turkey.

[Read More]

Wednesday Jul 03, 2013

Avek di Yunge Yorn

If ever there was a Yiddish song that proved the Jewish people were influenced by Ukranian folk songs, this must be it. The theme is one prevalent in folk songs: "My youth has fled. Oy vey. And I didn't even carpe diem!" The melody is so typical of Eastern European folk songs, that it's almost strange to hear it sung in Yiddish. You'd expect it to be sung by three young Ukranian peasant girls, dressed in beautiful white dresses embroidered with red, blue and yellow patterns, smiling brightly, and singing in perfect harmony with nasal voices (apparently, singing through the nose helped project the sound farther out to the wedding guests in the days preceding amplifiers and microphones). Anyway, here it is, with my best attempt at a nasal folksinger's voice.

[Read More]

Calendar

Feeds

Search

Recent entries

Links

Other blogs worth reading

Navigation

Referrers